NEW vs OLD VIOLIN: What to look for when buying your next level violin? | Violin Lounge TV #431

by | Jul 28, 2021 | 24 comments

I compare a new Australian violin with an old German violin from 1840 and tell you all about how to buy your intermediate or advanced violin:

Tip: Use headphones when listening to the audio samples

In the video I tell you all about how to choose between buying a new or an old violin, you’ll hear lots of sound samples of a new Australian violin and my old German violin. Also I explain what pricing you should think of for an intermediate or advanced violin and if a violin could be a great investment that increases in value. I go into what difference a bow makes and if I would buy this Australian made new violin.

Watch my interview with the maker of this Australian violin right here.

Did you stumble upon this video, but you’re looking into a beginner level or student violin, go here for all of my reviews and recommendations.

Hi! I'm Zlata

Let me help you find a great bow for your violin, so you can improve your bowing technique and sound quality:

Violin Bow Review | Violin Lounge TV #409

24 Comments

  1. Buzz Gags

    The German sounds fuller most if the time but the Australian sounds good too.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thanks for sharing!

      Reply
    • Marco

      Damn!
      I just bought my new Italian violin (spruce 2012, orange finished)..otherwise..

      Reply
      • Zlata

        Wonderful! What is the maker of your violin?

  2. Gustav

    These violins sounds to me quite equal in thr upper register. The Australian has in my opinion a clean and clear sound in the lower register. However very small difference.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thanks for sharing!

      Reply
  3. VT

    The problem is that the Australian violin is not played for a long time.
    playing a new violin, the sound is going better when playing.

    the sound of an old violin sounds better because it has been played for a long time.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      True! I played it intensively for a few days, but it definitely has more potential when played on for years.

      Reply
  4. Henk

    De Australian viool of de German viool, het hangt voor mij in deze voorbeelden af van het muziekstuk waarvan een klein deel gespeeld wordt. De German vond ik in het stukje van Mozart tamelijk bedekt klinken vergeleken met de Australian en voor nu gaf ik daarbij de voorkeur aan de Australian. In Brahms had ik de indruk dat ik de German toch even wat mooier vond klinken. Voor mij zijn de Australian en de German min of meer vergelijkbaar.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Bedankt voor het delen, Henk!

      Reply
  5. Jos. Verbruggen

    It was hard to choose, both violins sound super good.
    In the end I still choose the Australian violin, but played with the pernambucco bow.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Yes, they combine so nicely :).

      Reply
  6. John

    thank you for doing all this work for us and giving us all this information. Yes, the German violin perhaps a little darker and the Australian a touch brighter but both excellent. again, thank you.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thanks for sharing, John!

      Reply
  7. Joseph Tramacchi

    The German violin sounded more resonant and mellow with possibly a greater range of audible overtones and was well suited to the Bach excerpt. The Australian violin has a drier sound with a well defined character to the tone and a shorter decay rate, the overtones don’t linger as long. I preferred hearing the ‘Masquerade’ on it.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thank you for sharing, Joseph!

      Reply
  8. elisabeth latenstein

    Hi Zlata,
    Always interesting to hear two violins played back to back to compare them.
    What I mainly heard in the Australian violin is that the sound spectrum was more narrow, a bit sharper and less balanced over all the strings. The e-string particularly differed here.
    Whereas your old German violin had a broader spectrum, more depth, sounded more vivid and overall had a more interesting sound and story to listen to.
    It’s always difficult to exactly describe the sound but I hope you understand my attempt in doing so. I would stick to the German one too!

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thank you, Elisabeth, I agree!

      Reply
  9. Barbara

    I think the German violin sounds better but also probably seasoned longer.
    I’m a new student and wouldn’t spend that kind of money until you could play better.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thanks, Barbara!

      Reply
  10. Jon

    Well I listened with head phones as recommended and I think the baby wins 🙂

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Hahaha, points for the African/Czech/Dutch made then.

      Reply
  11. Lida Schaap - de Vries

    Both violins sound excellent! The german violin sounds a little warmer, deeper and smoother. But the german violin has been played on for 180 years comparing that against this ‘Joey’ isn’t exactly running an equal race. Nevertheless the young Australian has a very good, deep and warm sound with a good volume. And after it’s been played in for a longer time it will sound better and better.
    Buying an old violin is not that easy. You need to have enough knowledge to see what’s right or wrong, for example an old instrument could have woodworm and other flaws. But a lot can be repaired almost always. To buy an old violin it has to be ‘love at first sight’, I guess. You’ll take extra costs for restoration and or repair for granted.
    Buying a new violin is a lot easier. First of all they are brand new and if there is one with the sound you like you don’t have to search any longer. Buying a new violin has also the advantage of guarantee.
    Making a choice between your old German and ‘this Joey’ is not a fair comparison. But two equal Australian violins built by the same violin maker is fair and interesting.
    Chances of finding a violin like your ‘old German’ are very small. The Australian violin sounds excellent and if I had enough money in my pocket I would certainly give it a go with ‘little Joey’.

    Reply
    • Zlata

      Thank you for sharing, Lida!

      Reply

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