Different VIOLIN BOW HOLDS for Different Bowing Techniques | Violin Lounge TV #405

by | Jan 27, 2021 | Bowing Technique | 8 comments

Adjust your violin bow grip to the bowing technique you play

Did you know you can make SO many advanced techniques a LOT easier when you adjust your bow hold to the technique you play? Find out:

In this video I go through 13 examples in which your violin hold changes depending on the dynamics, the articulation or the type of bow stroke

In this way you can master difficult bowings, create more sound colors and deepen your musical expression.

These are subtle nuances that can be applied within the Franco-Belgian, Russian or any other bow hold

It does NOT mean that you change your type of bow hold back and forth, but that will become clear in the 13 examples that I show in the video.

Violin bow hold changes and is functional, but not relative

Sometimes students have difficulty with the specifics of the bow hold. I explain a bit more about this in my video about seamless bow changes right here.

13 examples of how your violin bow hold changes depending on what you play

#1 Tip vs Frog

At the tip your bow hold looks different as your fingers will be more stretched and you’ll have more pronation.

#2 Forte vs Piano

As you dig in the string to transfer a lot of weight, your bow hold will be different from when you almost lift the bow to play piano.

#3 Bow Changes

Detaché finger action at bow changes means your bow hold must be very flexible. Learn more about bowing smoothly in this video.

#4 String Crossings

In fast string crossings you mainly use movements in your wrist and fingers instead of your arm. I explain all about that in my tutorial about Bach’s E major partita right here.

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Hi! I'm Zlata

Classical violinist helping you overcome technical struggles and play with feeling by improving your bow technique.

#5 Chords

When you break a chord and want to maintain a strong tone, use your fingers.

#6 Landing the Bow

To smoothly land the bow on the string, use your fingers and wrist.

#7 Big Sound

Dig in the string, use a lot of pronation and bend your knuckles to create a deep sound.

#8 Martelé

Accents can be created by pushes with the index finger.

#9 Up Bow Staccato

The little accents on up bow staccato are done with the index finger.

#10 Spiccato

Lifting the wrist allow your bow to jump and your fingers move along with the bow.

#11 Sautillé

Adjust your bow hold to move along with this passive bow technique and avoid getting in the way of the natural jump of the bow.

Many violinists choose to lift the pinky off the bow and as it releases the bow even more.

#12 Up Bow and Down Bow Staccato

Both have their own bow hold.

#13 Flying Staccato

Your bow hold combines the techniques of spiccato and up bow staccato.

Does your violin bow hold changes while playing? Tell me about it in the comments below.

Violin Lesson #26 Andante op22C by Elgar EASY TUTORIAL Violin Lesson #27 Küchler EASY CONCERTINO op 11 2nd movement

8 Comments

  1. Suganthi Gunasekaran

    This was really helpful. Thank you mam.

    Reply
    • Michael

      I have watched the first two videos online and this lady is truly a great teacher. I have learned more from 10 minutes with her then in hours of other videos.

      Reply
  2. laurel anderson

    THANK YOU SO MUCH! YOU ARE A DAY BRIGHTENER AND GIVE ME INSPIRATION!
    I STRUGLLE IN SOME AREAS AND KNOW IT IS A MATTER OF PRACTICE. I FIND I ENJOY THE FIDDLE MUSIC MORE AND SEEM TO HAVE ISUSSES WITH PLAYING FAST AND CONSISTLY.
    WITH ALL YOUOR ENCOURAGEMENT, I WILL KEEP PLUGGING AWAY! LOVE YOUR UPBEAT MANNER AND WARM SMILE!

    Reply
  3. John Norton

    Zlata: This is one beautiful video. You put so many things together in minutes that outline years of practice for us to correctly accomplish. Your “Crystal Ball” gives us insight to the future so we are at least prepared to deal with some of the surprises that always find find us. Your clear, beautifully executed demonstrations of these basic bowings, and their differences, are enlightening and answers the mysterious questions we need help with. Do you mean to say that initial bow hold we were taught as beginners is not rigidly held for every note on every page? And what is so exaggerating about those exaggerations you show us? Isn’t that long scratch while beginning a martele perfectly normal? And that annoying bow bounce is something to be used?

    Ha ha… and the list goes on endlessly. You show our eyes and ears that all these questions have logical and very useful answers. By repeatedly using the “pause” button we can clearly follow the finest details of every step required. For basic bowing explanations I’ve never seen a better presentation than yours. Follow this up with your “24 Different Violin Bowing Techniques” video and we have applications, by the best players in pieces by the best composers, of everything you show us. But only yours clears up the mystery of what we are hearing, and the “why and how” it is to be done. Now perhaps I can practice with more intelligence. Thank you so much for this gem dear Zlata.

    Reply
    • Violinist Zlata Brouwer

      Thank you for your kind words, John. The bow hold shouldn’t be rigid. I teach beginners to move their fingers along with the bow stroke, like I show in the beginning of the video. This is stuff we can work on on all levels and techniques. The bow bounce is definitely something to be used in off the string bow techniques, like spiccato en ricochet. The bounce can be annoying in the beginning, but later on you’ll notice it has a function and can help you. Happy practicing, John, glad you enjoyed watching this video as much as I enjoyed making it :).

      Reply

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